Amid historic levels of forced displacement due to armed conflict, G7 countries’ military spending has hit record highs.

Archived version: https://archive.ph/22pTI

  • Eheran@lemmy.world
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    1 month ago

    That is not exactly surprising when the USA is in the group. Might as well only talk about them considering how extremely shifted it is.

    Like looking at 5 people, one is a millionaire and 4 homeless, and taking about how they have above average income.

    • Turun@feddit.de
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      1 month ago

      Additionally, this is total military spending vs foreign humanitarian support. So giving food to children in Gaza counts, but feeding the homeless in your own country does not.

      I still agree with the conclusion, but the headline is kinda rage bait.

      • tyler@programming.dev
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        1 month ago

        It doesn’t say it’s only foreign humanitarian support. It’s humanitarian aid for wars and disasters, which is literally the definition of humanitarian aid

        Humanitarian aid generally refers to the provision of immediate, short-term relief in crisis situations, such as food, water, shelter, and medical care. Humanitarian assistance, on the other hand, encompasses a broader range of activities, including longer-term support for recovery, rehabilitation, and capacity building. Humanitarian aid is distinct from development aid, which seeks to address underlying socioeconomic factors.

        What you are talking about is social welfare which isn’t the same thing at all.

        • Turun@feddit.de
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          1 month ago

          Interesting that there is a fine difference between humanitarian aid and humanitarian assistance. I doubt many journalist are this strict about their wording, but good to know nonetheless.

          Social welfare provides the exact same things (housing, food, medicine) but instead of some disaster zone somewhere it’s for disadvantaged citizens in your own country. Of course, the logistics are massively different, as well as the timeframe during which the services are provided. But it’s still basically the same thing: help other humans with fundamental necessities.

          So I would disagree with your claim that it “isn’t the same thing at all”. It differs in some details, but the central service and fundamental reasoning is the same.