• Reef@lemmy.caOP
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    25 days ago

    Louis-Dreyfus’ interview with Kara Swisher followed her profile in The New York Times from earlier this month in which she made headlines for saying it’s a “red flag” when comedians complain about political correctness. While she never mentioned her “Seinfeld” co-star Jerry Seinfeld by name, her interview was published soon after he went viral for blaming the “extreme left and P.C. culture” for killing TV comedy because “people [are now] worrying so much about offending other people.”

    “To have an antenna about sensitivities is not a bad thing,” Louis-Dreyfus told The Times. “It doesn’t mean that all comedy goes out the window as a result. When I hear people starting to complain about political correctness — and I understand why people might push back on it — but to me that’s a red flag, because it sometimes means something else.”

    • Pronell@lemmy.world
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      25 days ago

      And for Seinfeld, of all people, to say something that is so… dumb.

      It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia is essentially Seinfeld on crack. You have a cast of bad people with little redeeming qualities who are actively becoming worse people. And it’s a massive hit that’s been running longer than Seinfeld’s own show.

      In addition, what the hell, man? You are the cleanest, most white bread standup I’ve ever seen. I paid to see you do a ten minute bit on raisins that killed. You do not DO edgy comedy, so shut the fuck up.

      • ours@lemmy.world
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        25 days ago

        And let’s not forget about the guy who made the Seinfeld show what it was had an amazing run with his own show Curb your enthusiasm.

        Not quite as spicy as Always Sunny but certainly had more punch that Seinfeld.

        The common thread is it is hilarious to make the terrible people the butts of the jokes, not the minorities. It also helps running with some aspects as a joke (Mack’s closeted gay in Sunny) and having them pay out emotionaly.

        Being gay is not the joke like before “PC”, the repression of it, the forced toxic masculinity is. But I guess that’s a bit harder than kicking down so some conservative comedies are just crying they can’t just do it like before.

        Since when was comedy, especially edgy comedy, about doing the same thing as before? What happened to pushing the envelope?

        Who wants the hear the same tired old jokes? Innovate or make space for new voices.