Let’s imagine it’s currently Wednesday the 1st. Does “next Saturday” mean Saturday the 4th (the next Saturday to occur) or Saturday the 11th (the Saturday of next week)?

  • Executive Chimp
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    173 months ago

    It goes like this

    “Next Saturday”

    “You mean this Saturday? Or next Saturday?”

    “Next Saturday”

    “Okay”

    Because English is not an efficient tool for communication.

    • @Grabthar@lemmy.world
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      33 months ago

      Absolutely this. Because it is never clear which is meant without being qualified, you have to do this every time unless you specify. I would just say Saturday the 4th to save the exchange.

        • @Mr_Dr_Oink@lemmy.world
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          03 months ago

          Thinking about it. Couldn’t it be argued that its actually quite efficient?

          You have lots of words that have multiple meanings and the difference is i the context, the tone, and the words used in conjunction with them. For example.

          Fuck.

          It can be an insult, a proposition, an exclaimation of pain, a state of repair etc. And all these things and the rest can be expressed with that one word.

          Theres more just like it but just as an example.

          • Executive Chimp
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            13 months ago

            Why say many words when few work? Or whatever the Office quote is.

            It would be efficient if (when) the meaning was adequately conveyed. If the usage necessitates a back-and-forth then that is inefficient.

            • @Mr_Dr_Oink@lemmy.world
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              3 months ago

              I dont understand. My example is perfectly described by your point. One word that has many uses where context implies meaning.