I’ve been using fedora but I would like to try something new and I think about arch linux but I don’t know if it’s good for gaming. What do you think?

  • Refurbished Refurbisher@lemmy.sdf.org
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    3 months ago

    Every distro is going to be good for gaming. Arch is going to be about equal to Fedora when it comes to gaming (both are good).

    SteamOS is based on Arch, for instance.

    You’re not really going to see a difference when it comes to compatibility or performance, and even if you did, that’s usually just a configuration issue (like setting a large enough VM heap size, which distros are starting to do by default anyway).

    • lemmyvore@feddit.nl
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      3 months ago

      SteamOS is based on Arch, for instance.

      Heavily tweaked and customized by Valve… you’re not going to get the same experience on vanilla Arch.

  • UnfortunateShort@lemmy.world
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    3 months ago

    Arch is perfectly fine for gaming. I use EndeavourOS with KDE and Steam + Lutris (as Flatpaks) on top. Quite similar to the setup you would have on Steam OS, but I would highly recommend using btrfs as your file system and setting up snapshots.*

    While I have had little to no problems so far, compatibility issues can still occur on rolling release distros, and it’s extremely convenient to just be able to undo an update.

    *This is quite simple btw., you just need to install snapper, snap-pac and btrfs-assistant. The latter serves as a GUI for btrfs setup in general. Create a config for your filesystem root (‘/’) under ‘Snapper’, and under ‘Snapper Settings’ enable ‘Snapper cleanup’. You can also set the number of snapshots to retain there, but note that two will be created per system upgrade by snap-pac. I would suggest to also enable balances and scrubs for ‘/’ and ‘/home’ in the maintenance-tab.

    • Banthex@feddit.de
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      3 months ago

      Is there a Arch with Installer that delivers this as Standart for rollbacks? I use Fedora Silverblue thats really great but only in my Laptop.

      • UnfortunateShort@lemmy.world
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        3 months ago

        Garuda Linux has a setup where you can even boot into the snapshots from GRUB, but it is a little more bloated than EndeavourOS and I feel like it’s also less stable. Still definitely worth a try.

      • lemmyvore@feddit.nl
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        3 months ago

        Is there a Arch with Installer that delivers this as Standart for rollbacks?

        Yes, Manjaro. It will set everything up for you if you choose btrfs for the root partition. It will take snapshots before every upgrade and you will find them in a Grub submenu.

        Obligatory disclaimer, Manjaro is a super-opinionated and customized Arch derivative, to the point some people don’t consider it Arch. It uses the Arch binary packages but delays and curates them into a “stable” branch which doesn’t exist on Arch. It basically requires you to stick to this stable branch, to use a LTS kernel, to install drivers through their driver manager etc.

        Personally I like it because I like the idea of a rolling distro with a safety net, and it’s been working great for me over the last 4 years (daily driver for work and gaming). But it’s not everybody’s cup of tea.

  • dino
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    3 months ago

    Its the best distro for gaming. Valve is using it, rolling distro.

  • doggle@lemmy.dbzer0.com
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    3 months ago

    It’s good. The steam deck’s version of steamOS is arch based, so that should tell you a lot about its capabilities.

    I’d recommend choosing an Arch-based distro like Endeavour or Garuda so you don’t have to go through the rigmarole of installing vanilla Arch.

    • Reawake9179@lemmy.kde.social
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      3 months ago

      While SteamOS is Arch based, i don’t think they really use it the Arch way. It’s run as an image based immutable OS, so they control the packages and not run at the bleeding edge.

      You might run into problems more likely than SteamOS will.

      Although i didnt’t have problems gaming on Arch, it’s not the same

      • lemmyvore@feddit.nl
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        3 months ago

        I think they confirmed in an interview at one point that they don’t roll with it. They take the binaries they need from it, test it and freeze it. Initially they were using Debian but ended up needing more recent package versions and apparently Arch binaries in core and extra were more suitable to their purposes than Debian testing.

        • rotopenguin@infosec.pub
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          3 months ago

          Valve was using Debian way-back-when, but the pace of getting new stuff into debian proper is too glacial for Valve. Valve is putting a lot of work into “making the linux graphics stack rather good for games”, and having those improvements integrated upstream quicker means that Valve can get to work on the next set of improvements.

          Valve is still using Debian as the basis for their runtime environments for games (pressure vessel). Debian’s slowness is great for providing a stable ABI for the parts that come into contact with (seldom maintained) game code. There is some amount of magic that goes into gluing the stable runtimes with rapidly changing stuff like Mesa.

    • Spectranox@lemmy.dbzer0.com
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      3 months ago

      Arch installs aren’t too bad, it’s the post-install setup that’ll get you though since a fresh install is guaranteed to detonate if you don’t disarm it.

      It doesn’t even have to be complex anymore thanks to archinstall.

    • pipsqueak1984@lemmy.ca
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      3 months ago

      Arch documentation is great, if you’re only doing it once it shouldn’t really be a concern.

      • lemmyvore@feddit.nl
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        3 months ago

        How about doing it never.

        I’ll never understand why some people think that the arch install is such a transcendental event that you absolutely must subject yourself to.

        And even if it were, sometimes you just want to install Linux not have a life-changing experience.

          • lemmyvore@feddit.nl
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            3 months ago

            Neither installing Arch nor doing LFS will teach you how Linux works. They’re at least one or two steps removed from the system’s inner workings.

            Secondly, that’s way too high a bar.

            • qpsLCV5@lemmy.ml
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              3 months ago

              it definitely taught me about how linux works, at least the parts that are relevant for most users. starting from a clean install without any kind of gui (or common networking tools) really made me understand all the building blocks modern desktop linux uses. sure, installing a full blown desktop environment skips most things, but going with just a window manager and adding required features package by package really does help with understanding, and if a problem does pop up later you’ll know exactly where to look, instead of having to search super generic terms.

              • Mike@lemmy.ml
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                3 months ago

                Just because Linux as an operating system can have that experience, doesn’t mean everyone wants or, really, needs that experience. Some people buy cars to drive and want it to just work. Others buy cars to play with. Some people dj music that is already made, others buy a guitar.

        • pipsqueak1984@lemmy.ca
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          3 months ago

          It’s pretty damn informative, that’s why I encourage people who are interested in Arch to do it once.

          I agree that if you are doing it several times it’s a waste to do manually all the time.

  • Epzillon@lemmy.ml
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    3 months ago

    I’ve been using Nobara for some time and it’s amazing. Nice installer and gets all drivers and fixed applied from the get go. Also it is maintained by GloriousEggroll himself.

    • TwoBeeSan@lemmy.world
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      3 months ago

      Echo nobara.

      Been the most stable nvidia experience for my odd setup.

      Able to handle an ultrawide and normal monitor 1440 at different hz and one is display port other is hdmi.

      Would run into the occasional hickup with manjaro. Been all good on nobara

    • Banthex@feddit.de
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      3 months ago

      Omg this is something i have to try!!! I switched to Fedora Silverblue for Laptop and this ostree Thing is insane! Thanks!

  • heschlie@lemmy.schlunker.com
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    3 months ago

    As others have said I doubt you will see a difference but I can attest to arch working just fine for gaming. Between steam and Lutris I haven’t run into any real issues.

    So if you’re wanting to try arch go for it with confidence that your gaming experience likely won’t be impacted.

  • BaumGeist@lemmy.ml
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    3 months ago

    Whatever you use, make sure it’s the furthest upstream. Everything else is dependent on the upstream to update systemwide. Yes, some downstream distros will fix certain issues before upstream does, but because their teams are generally smaller, they won’t fix all the issues in any given distro. And feature/major version updates start at the top and trickle down.

    • Hammersbald@lemmy.world
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      3 months ago

      As someone who uses Garuda Linux as my main OS, I agree! Gaming works right out the box and the OS is incredibly stable. If hiccups should arise, timeshift makes booting into a previous state very easy.