• themachine@lemmy.world
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    2 months ago

    Just look at the bit rate of what you are streaming and multiply it by 3 then add a little extra for overhead.

  • WFloyd@lemmy.world
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    2 months ago

    I have 35mbps upload from the ISP, and limit each stream to 8mbps. This covers direct streaming all my 1080p content and a 4K transcode as needed.

  • Faceman🇦🇺
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    2 months ago

    Are you transcoding?

    4mbit per client for 1080 is generally a workable minimum for the average casual watcher if you have H265 compatible clients (and a decent encoder, like a modern intel CPU for example), 6 - 8mbit per client if its H264 only.

    Remember that the bitrate to quality curve for live transcoding isn’t as good as a slow, non-real-time encode done the brute force way on a CPU. so if you have a few videos that look great at 4mbit, dont assume your own transcodes will look quite that nice, you’re using a GPU to get it done as quickly as possible, with acceptable quality, not as slowly and carefully as possible for the best compression.

  • SigHunter@lemmy.kde.social
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    2 months ago

    My family is very satisfied with 6 mbit/s per stream. Some HEVC, most H264. They see it as high quality. 3 Streams would be 18 to 20 Mbit/s

  • Diabolo96@lemmy.dbzer0.com
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    2 months ago

    I don’t have a jellyfin server but 1MB/s (8mbps) for each person watching 1080p (3.6Gb per hour of content for each file) seems reasonable. ~3MB/s (24mbps) upload and as much download should work.

      • Diabolo96@lemmy.dbzer0.com
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        2 months ago

        I had a hunch that writing the actual Upload/download speed tather than mbps was probably wrong. My bad, my internet provider lingo is rusted.

        • GenderNeutralBro@lemmy.sdf.org
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          2 months ago

          Gotcha. Typically lowercase b=bit and uppercase B=Byte, but it’s hard to tell what people mean sometimes, especially in casual posts.

          Come to think of it, I messed up the capitalization too. Should be a capital M for mega.

      • SigHunter@lemmy.kde.social
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        2 months ago

        Back in the day, the rule was mbit (megabit) for data in transfer (network speed) and MB (megabyte) for data at rest, like on HDDs

          • bitwaba@lemmy.world
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            2 months ago

            The real answer?

            Data is transmitted in packets. Each packet has a packet header, and a packet payload. The total data transmitted is the header + payload.

            If you’re transmitting smaller packet sizes, it means your header is a larger percentage of the total packet size.

            Measuring in megabits is the ISP telling you “look, your connection is good for X amount of data. How you choose to use that data is up to you. If you want more of it going to your packet headers instead of your payload, fine.” A bit is a bit is a bit to your ISP.

          • @Moneo @SigHunter Networking came to be when there were lots of different implementations of a ‘byte’. The PDP-10 was prevalent at the time the internet was being developed for example, which supported variable byte lengths of up to 36-bits per byte.

            Network protocols had to support every device regardless of its byte size, so protocol specifications settled on bits as the lowest common unit size, while referring to 8-bit fields as ‘octets’ before 8-bit became the de facto standard byte length.

      • lud@lemm.ee
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        2 months ago

        The best format imo is MB/s and Mbit/s

        It avoids all confusion.