• audiomodder@lemmy.blahaj.zone
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    1 month ago

    Compiled Java is still cross-platform. It’s been a few years for me, but when I last worked in C# it was a giant PITA to work on it in Linux or MacOS. I hope it’s gotten better.

    • vithigar@lemmy.ca
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      1 month ago

      .NET (not .NET Framework) is cross platform and can be compiled into native binaries on a variety of platforms. There is however the wrinkle of not all the libraries within .NET being supported on all platforms. Most notably, everything involving a graphical UI is Windows only.

      The most well known cross platform .NET project you probably have heard about is Jellyfin.

    • JustAnotherRando@lemmy.world
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      1 month ago

      Modern .NET (i.e. .NET Core and later) is cross platform. In fact, .NET APIs now are routinely run in containers not based on Windows.

    • Kogasa@programming.dev
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      1 month ago

      It’s a lot better with some notable exceptions. First, .NET Core is multiplatform by design, so it is by default quite portable. The .NET Core CLI is extremely powerful and means a CLI workflow is totally feasible (and also simplifies CI pipelines). The new “multiplatform” application framework, MAUI, runs on Windows, Mac, iOS, and Android, but not Linux/GTK/QT etc. You can maybe attribute this to the design philosophy of abstracting native controls, of which “Linux” itself has none, but either way it’s useless on Linux. Third party frameworks like Avalonia do work very well on Linux.