• 13 Posts
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Joined 7 months ago
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Cake day: January 5th, 2024

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  • You absolutely cannot go meet them. They are kept in an extremely sterile environment because, in order to be the most appropriate for transplant, their immune systems are turned way down.

    Source: some youtube videos I’ve seen, in the science/education space. I don’t recall the exact channel.



  • I say it’s definitely without a doubt a reference to the holocaust, but I can’t say what the joke was supposed to be or what the author thinks about the actual holocaust.

    Seems like the man gets very angry the second he realizes he’s making a bug holocaust. Is that funny?














  • NeatNittoProgrammer Humor@lemmy.mlblahaj
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    6 days ago

    Yup, the .text “file” is binary, and I assume it’s exactly that - the executable machine code - but I did not try opening it with any hex editor or disassembler. I tried with a text editor, knowing in advance that it’s going to fail, and it did - there were a bunch of null or error characters shown and the editor crashed soon after.

    I honestly didn’t look any further into it, because I just don’t care. Archive Manager apparently just splits up the sections of the .exe and exposes them as if they were files in an archive. Seems as useful an approach as any.



  • NeatNittoProgrammer Humor@lemmy.mlblahaj
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    6 days ago

    I’m assuming Unicode anyway, and UTF-8 is by far the most natural because most files will be in ASCII. A “normal form” (see link above), you might think of it as a canonical form, is a way to check if two strings are equivalent, even if they encoded the text differently. Like the example mentioned on Wikipedia:

    For example, the distinct Unicode strings “U+212B” (the angstrom sign “Å”) and “U+00C5” (the Swedish letter “Å”) are both expanded by NFD (or NFKD) into the sequence “U+0041 U+030A” (Latin letter “A” and combining ring above “°”) which is then reduced by NFC (or NFKC) to “U+00C5” (the Swedish letter “Å”).