image description:
meme template is two buff men beating a rectangle with the following quadrants:

  • rectangle labeled me saying: I just learnt object pronouns o/a, você, nos, os/as. portuguese isn’t that difficult
  • red buffed man labeled -lo/-la, -los/-las with infinitives laughing
  • purple buffed man labeled lhe, lhes with verbs ending in a joining red and laughing hysterically
  • both beating the rectangle while laughing, with rectangle crying.
  • @Thranduil@lemmy.world
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    242 months ago

    What I do when im trying to learn a language is caveman it. Me hungry eat food. As long as im understood it works then over time that sentence will evolve to I am feeling hungry I would like to eat some food

    • @lemmesayOP
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      52 months ago

      that’s exactly how I learnt Spanish. just consuming content until I began speaking it with relative ease.
      but with portuguese, i’m finding it difficult. I’ve tried listening to different genres like sartanejo, bossa nova, etc. but my brain rejects them all for some reason. idk if it has to do with the slow rhythm.
      maybe someone here has some pop recommendation for me? or maybe even short series or YouTube channels.

      • @bennypr0fane
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        102 months ago

        I would not recommend using music to learn a language, especially if the lyrics don’t stick in yr head easily (which IMO is basically its only advantage). The lyrics normally do not contain everyday vocabulary and/or grammar, it’s just not useful for communication. It is, however, often helpful for forming some sort of “emotional bond” with the target language, increasing motivation to dig deeper into it. It can also give you a better access to its specific, well, musical qualities. But then, just the bare spoken (not sung) sound of it can accomplish that just as well, if you’re willing to listen. Music will not help you get along with everyday tasks, improving communications, talking about yourself and other subjects, participating in discussions etc. Intentfully listening to spoken text/conversations is far more effective for that - even more so if it’s authentic (not scripted, not produced for recordings, read by actors etc)

        • @lemmesayOP
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          22 months ago

          music is how I learnt most of the Spanish. it’s not that I only listen to music. I watch small shows, videos, memes, do courses on language learning apps, visit Spanish-speaking forums, talk to Spanish speakers, etc.

          but music has indeed played a much bigger role in my journey, I’d say. also, when I listen to music, I have translations opened in another tab(I usually use lyricstranslate website for this).

          and the Spanish music that I listen to is reggaeton, which isn’t very musical, let’s just say, haha. it’s just spoken Spanish with autotune.

        • @geoma@lemmy.ml
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          2 months ago

          I have to say I learned both english and portuguese mainly through listening and singing music while reading the lyrics. I also use these tools when teaching English students, and have found them to be very successful. Of course you should complement with engaging in conversations, writing, etc. But for me, music is the number one resource when learning a new language.

      • @mysteriousquote@lemmy.world
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        2 months ago

        I’m in a similar boat, Spanish degree from college, but learning Portuguese now, and I’ve found that kids programming like Sesasme Street (Rua Sésamo) is really great for getting some fundamentals. They tend to speak slower, avoid idioms and focus on foundational parts of the language. And the good thing is, you can find all 30ish episodes of Rua Sésamo on YouTube

        Edit: Rua Sésamo is European Portuguese, if you want Brazil, then Vila Sésamo is what you’re looking for (or simply Sésamo)

        • @lemmesayOP
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          22 months ago

          thanks mate! and good luck on your language journey.

    • @lemmesayOP
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      82 months ago

      obrigado mano o(_ _)o

  • @Dagnet@lemmy.world
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    92 months ago

    The times I dated non-brazilian girls I always told them “don’t bother learning Portuguese, it’s hell”. Heck, I don’t even speak proper Portuguese myself

    • @thedarkfly@feddit.nl
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      92 months ago

      Damn I’m surprised you say that. I’m a native french speaker I’ve always thought that portuguese is a godsend. So fewer bullshit, so much more rational…

      • @Dagnet@lemmy.world
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        12 months ago

        One thing being worse doesnt make the other better, I know for example that french counting is basically insanity. But then again, when you get really deep into portuguese things get real non sensical

  • TimeSquirrel
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    2 months ago

    As both a fluent English and German speaker, somehow I can understand Dutch. Or at least about 80-90% of it.

      • TimeSquirrel
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        2 months ago

        Nope, not even gonna try. It’s mainly from reading that I can pick it up. It looks almost like English and German got smashed together.

    • @lemmesayOP
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      42 months ago

      desejo que isso seja a verdade

  • T Jedi
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    32 months ago

    Wait until you learn about “mesóclise”

    • @lemmesayOP
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      12 months ago

      thanks for the heads-up. can’t wait to cry more!

      • T Jedi
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        22 months ago

        Do not worry too much. At least in Brazil, almost no one uses mesóclise on casual conversation, and it can come across as pedantic.

    • @lemmesayOP
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      22 months ago

      that’s why I bailed out of it after a week!

  • @Kidplayer_666@lemm.ee
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    32 months ago

    Espera até te aperceberes que em certas circunstâncias os pronomes vão para outros sítios nas frases (em português de Portugal)