Our retention pond in our neighborhood has a lot of algae and problematic plant growth due to the surrounding farms and lawn runoff, so we’re experimenting with a floating island to pull nutrients out before they can cause problems. This will also provide some interesting flowering plants, and more fish habitats.

Will be an interesting experiment to see what survives and what does poorly.

Zinnias, sunflowers, marigolds, and a few others are in net pots, inserted into cutouts in EVA foam mats.

Design is from:
http://www.beemats.com/

More reading:
https://arstechnica.com/science/2024/02/flowers-grown-floating-on-polluted-waterways-can-help-clean-up-nutrient-runoff/

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2666765723000637?via%3Dihub

    • MilitantAtheist@lemmy.world
      link
      fedilink
      English
      arrow-up
      10
      arrow-down
      1
      ·
      2 months ago

      Love that it’s not a YouTube video. Someone needs to fix an AI that scrubs YouTube tutorials and makes text and image versions. 😐

    • mipadaitu@lemmy.worldOP
      link
      fedilink
      English
      arrow-up
      1
      ·
      2 months ago

      Very interesting project, I’m curious if this one ends up being more cost effective at scale due to the difference in planting styles.

    • mipadaitu@lemmy.worldOP
      link
      fedilink
      English
      arrow-up
      20
      arrow-down
      1
      ·
      2 months ago

      For this year, we’re only interested in seeing how the island looks, and if the plants can thrive with low effort.

      Next year, if all goes well, we’ll add a lot more islands and do water testing.

      I don’t expect a significant impact to water quality with a single mat.

      • Atelopus-zeteki@kbin.run
        link
        fedilink
        arrow-up
        9
        arrow-down
        1
        ·
        2 months ago

        That was my first thought, along the lines of ‘how much plant mass will you need to significantly reduce N in the water, enough so that it has sufficient reduction of unwanted photosynthesis’? I look forward to reading of your progress.

        • mipadaitu@lemmy.worldOP
          link
          fedilink
          English
          arrow-up
          11
          arrow-down
          1
          ·
          2 months ago

          The projects they are doing in Florida say they are targeting 10% surface coverage, that would be unrealistic in our situation, so we’re just going to do our best and balance cost/looks/effort with effectiveness.

          • Atelopus-zeteki@kbin.run
            link
            fedilink
            arrow-up
            2
            arrow-down
            1
            ·
            2 months ago

            Interesting, so less than 10% might be sufficient for your needs? That dosen’t sound too onerous. I was at Fairchild Tropical Garden in Miami, FL some years ago. They had a small pond, roughly 20X30 feet more or less, with Amazonian plants. Initially the local algae was interfering with the Amazonian species, so they put black dye in the water to inhibit the algae. At the time, there was also a showing of Dale Chihuly’s glass work in the garden, including several 1-2 ft. multicolored spheres floating the the black water of the Amazonian pond; looking like alien planets floating in the darkness of space. It may well have been this pond, pictured.

            • mipadaitu@lemmy.worldOP
              link
              fedilink
              English
              arrow-up
              4
              arrow-down
              1
              ·
              2 months ago

              Well, to get to 10% coverage on this pond, we would need 700 of these islands (assuming they were all the same size), which would mean we needed to prep around 37,000 plants every winter to install every spring.

              We’ll probably shoot for a more realistic target to start with.

  • SchmidtGenetics@lemmy.world
    link
    fedilink
    English
    arrow-up
    10
    arrow-down
    7
    ·
    edit-2
    2 months ago

    What a fascinating idea!

    Iirc, there is some plants that are better at pulling the crap out of soil, should be the same for water. So maybe research some of those for options?

    I’ve read cannabis/hemp can be grown to remediate some places.

    I’ll give the links a read when I get time later, thanks growmie.

    Linky for cannabis

    • mipadaitu@lemmy.worldOP
      link
      fedilink
      English
      arrow-up
      14
      arrow-down
      1
      ·
      2 months ago

      Love it, but we’re not as concerned about metals or toxins as we are about excess nutrients.

      The papers I listed have plants that they’ve been using for their remediation, and we’re following those lists. I know some of the researchers on those projects, and we’ll modify our plant list based on any changes in their recommendations.

      • SchmidtGenetics@lemmy.world
        link
        fedilink
        English
        arrow-up
        4
        arrow-down
        18
        ·
        2 months ago

        Cannabis would pull out excess nutrients as well, I’m just saying there’s probably other options if you wanted to do a little research, but apparently no one wanted to discuss this topic.

        • mipadaitu@lemmy.worldOP
          link
          fedilink
          English
          arrow-up
          13
          arrow-down
          1
          ·
          2 months ago

          I am doing research on this, why do you think I’m not? I posted several links to resources.

          • SchmidtGenetics@lemmy.world
            link
            fedilink
            English
            arrow-up
            2
            arrow-down
            16
            ·
            edit-2
            2 months ago

            Well you rebuffed and turned additional avenues I gave you to look up, it didn’t sound like you were willing to do anything additional. Cannabis does all of those things you are looking for, so clearly there’s more than what the researches you’re using for options.

            Usually when someone shares a topic they want to talk about it and learn more, is that not why you posted?

            • mipadaitu@lemmy.worldOP
              link
              fedilink
              English
              arrow-up
              12
              arrow-down
              1
              ·
              2 months ago

              I’m not sure why you’re acting like I didn’t respond to what you posted. Your paper discussed heavy metal toxicity and I responded that this wasn’t a concern in our situation.

              I’m not sure why you are offended at my post, because I responded directly to the topic you were discussing.

              • SchmidtGenetics@lemmy.world
                link
                fedilink
                English
                arrow-up
                2
                arrow-down
                14
                ·
                2 months ago

                Through discussion, which was extremely hard, you found out that it can be used for both, and there is potentially other options you can find out for your floating garden.

                Why do you think I was offended by your post? I was trying to start a discussion and you apparently immediately thought I said you didn’t do any research.

                • BubbleMonkey@slrpnk.net
                  link
                  fedilink
                  English
                  arrow-up
                  16
                  arrow-down
                  1
                  ·
                  2 months ago

                  I’m not OP, but I can answer your question.

                  You are coming across as argumentative and rather rude about your insistence, when OP has already said whatever you want them to look into is beyond the current scope of the project, which roughly translates to “thanks, but I’m not interested in doing that right now”.

                  And in response to that, to telling you it’s not in the current scope of a trial project, you are implying they are not doing research or learning or whatever it is (you literally said in your second comment “if you want to do a little research” which does indeed imply you feel they didn’t do enough). When really, you just want them to do something with their time that they don’t want to do, and frankly don’t need to do at this first stage of trial. And you seem to be getting butthurt that they aren’t interested in doing what you want them to. The condescending tone in the comment I’m replying to is a dead giveaway.

                  Besides which, not everyone wants to deal with growing weed or hemp which looks identical. In fact, most people don’t want to deal with it (obtaining licenses, dealing with theft, etc.). So your focus on that specific plant through your comments seems really genuinely weird, like you can’t fathom people not being stoners or something. That’s quite off-putting.

                  If you were genuinely trying to start a conversation, you may want to look at how you approach that. When someone says they aren’t interested, like OP did, you can say “ok, well if anyone else is, or if it interests you in the future, here’s the info” and someone will probably reply to it if they want to talk about. You can’t just unilaterally decide what people are going to talk about and force them to participate if they don’t want to discuss it, which honestly seems like what you were trying to do.

    • rdyoung@lemmy.world
      link
      fedilink
      English
      arrow-up
      5
      ·
      2 months ago

      Yep, hemp has been long known to rejuvenate soil. It’s been used for decades (or more) as a rotation crop to restore soil after something like corn or wheat sucks up all of the nutrients.

          • mipadaitu@lemmy.worldOP
            link
            fedilink
            English
            arrow-up
            4
            arrow-down
            2
            ·
            2 months ago

            Ok, great. Show me a paper that explains what you are talking about and I’ll read it.

            I’m following peer reviewed papers on how to remediate ponds, and you’re telling me that they are incorrect or insufficient.

            • Username@feddit.de
              link
              fedilink
              English
              arrow-up
              5
              arrow-down
              1
              ·
              2 months ago

              I’ll add another condescending advice for you: Don’t feed the troll.

              No seriously, those two other commenters are either insane or trolling. They are completely ignoring your objective and just going on about “rejuvenation”.

              Please stay as you are and stand your well informed ground!

              • mipadaitu@lemmy.worldOP
                link
                fedilink
                English
                arrow-up
                2
                arrow-down
                1
                ·
                2 months ago

                Yeah, I originally thought they were commenting in good faith, shoulda stopped two comments sooner.

                Don’t understand what the issue is, I just want sources for recommendations, the only source either of them shared was for a topic that was irrelevant to the discussion.

      • SchmidtGenetics@lemmy.world
        link
        fedilink
        English
        arrow-up
        4
        arrow-down
        3
        ·
        edit-2
        2 months ago

        For soil rejuvenation you mulch it back into the soil for compost I thought, you can’t do that if you’re using it for remediation to pull stuff out of the soil as you would be just be putting it right back in again.

        • rdyoung@lemmy.world
          link
          fedilink
          English
          arrow-up
          4
          ·
          2 months ago

          You are correct but I think hemp is similar to clover in that there is some symbiotic relationship with other organisms that help rejuvenate the soil even if you don’t mulch it back it in. I could be wrong here but I know that plenty of farmers grow hemp between other crops and likely don’t “waste” it by mulching it back in.

          If you are looking to pull bad stuff out of water, I’d think that growing anything that would hold onto the bad stuff as it falls to the bottom of the river or lake and stores it there would be a solution as well as harvesting and transporting it elsewhere.

          • mipadaitu@lemmy.worldOP
            link
            fedilink
            English
            arrow-up
            5
            arrow-down
            2
            ·
            2 months ago

            There would be some benefits to growing hemp, but in our situation, it wouldn’t apply. We aren’t looking to add nutrients to the water, we’re looking to remove it.

            We aren’t concerned about other toxins that the hemp would absorb, so while it might be useful in some areas with more industrial pollution, it doesn’t apply to this project.

            • SchmidtGenetics@lemmy.world
              link
              fedilink
              English
              arrow-up
              2
              arrow-down
              8
              ·
              edit-2
              2 months ago

              Cannabis can be used for rejuvenation and remediation, it pulls out toxins and nutrients, but can also add nutrients. It can do anything, it’s just how it’s used, so yes it could maybe apply to your project.

        • rdyoung@lemmy.world
          link
          fedilink
          English
          arrow-up
          1
          arrow-down
          8
          ·
          edit-2
          2 months ago

          Did this get downvoted for the bondage bit? Bunch of vanilla fuddy duddies round these parts it seems.