• theluddite@lemmy.ml
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    2 months ago

    I wish we had less selection, in general. My family lives in Spain, and I’ve also lived in France. This is just my observation, but American grocery stores clearly emphasize always having a consistent variety, whereas my Spanish family expects to eat higher quality produce seasonally. I suspect that this is a symptom of a wider problem, not the cause, but American groceries are just fucking awful by comparison, and so much more expensive too.

      • Wooki@lemmy.world
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        2 months ago

        Move to straya, plenty of jobs atm, free healthcare, not a lot of homes and no where near the consumer brand choice. But it also means rich are not as rich, and no guns (by comparison) so kids are safe in schools!

        Most supermarkets have plenty of fresh food, its better and cheaper to buy from farmers markets, but you can get by with the super chains( not going to get into the profiteering from them, save that for another day).

    • Wooki@lemmy.world
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      2 months ago

      Fresh food is weirdly expensive in the US. Got to give the US props for being consistently expensive when it comes to health related expenses I guess.

      It seems bizarre for such a rich country to have the priorities so backwards.

      health and well being? Nah.

  • Ghostalmedia@lemmy.world
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    2 months ago

    I feel like this thread is going really be “available in your part of the US.”

    Grocery stores and populations are pretty varied across the US. What you can easily get in a San Francisco, Manhattan, or Boise grocery store can differ quite a bit.

  • anon6789@lemmy.world
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    2 months ago

    Bananas other than the Cavendish and a greater variety of potatoes. There are supposed to be so many varieties of each out there, but we only get one banana and 3 or 4 potatoes.

    The cherimoya is also pretty good from what I remember, so I would like to have that again for >$5.

    • Blackout@kbin.run
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      2 months ago

      The variety of bananas in Vietnam was great. I was going to put that here since they are impossible to import quickly enough.

      • anon6789@lemmy.world
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        2 months ago

        I got mine from a higher end grocery store (Wegmans) so something like that is your best bet. Keep searching!

        Ooo, the Ugli Fruit aka Jamaican Tangelo was good too that I found there!

    • Humanius@lemmy.world
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      2 months ago

      Isn’t blackcurrant illegal in the US? I remember hearing that somewhere anyway.
      Such a shame, cassis (blackcurrant soda) makes for such a tasty drink.

      • tal@lemmy.today
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        2 months ago

        You can order blackcurrant drinks online, as well as getting extract.

        googles

        It sounds like the problem was that they could host a fungus that affected other plants, but it’s been allowed on a state-by-state basis for some decades after they found a resistant variant.

        https://www.grunge.com/879107/heres-why-blackcurrant-was-banned-in-the-us-for-over-50-years/

        By the end of the 19th century, farmers noticed that blackcurrants had introduced an invasive species called blister fungus that killed white pine trees, per Business Insider. The fungus solely spreads through blackcurrants rather than from pine tree to pine tree. That means the U.S. was faced with a choice at the time: blackcurrants or the white pine. With national forests highly valued for the timber industry sales used to develop the U.S. as we know it, they chose to protect the white pine.

        In the early 20th century, the U.S. government made it illegal to farm blackcurrants and put forth resources to eradicate all Ribes plants from the environment, according to Business Insider. Interestingly, European agriculture met this fungus long ago when it was introduced in blackcurrant plants, but they didn’t rely on white pine as fiercely as the U.S., and the “white pine was sacrificed to retain the Ribes,” according to “History of White Pine Blister Rust Control: A Personal Account.”

        Blackcurrants come back

        After more than half a century, scientists discovered a new variant of blackcurrant that was resistant to the fungal disease that threatened the white pine. Without the threat to the timber industry, the U.S. government “left it up to the states to lift the ban” blackcurrants in 1966 (via Cornell University). It wasn’t until 2003 when New York, where blackcurrants were most heavily produced in the late 19th century, became the first state to uplift the blackcurrant ban in the continental U.S. Since then, some other states like Connecticut and Vermont have also rescinded their bans. But neighboring Massachusetts and Maine (or “The Pine Tree” state) are some of the many other states in which such bans remain (per AHS Gardening, Mass.gov).

        • graycube@kbin.social
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          2 months ago

          I believe you can grow them as long as they are more than 150 feet from a white pine tree. The plants were originally banned because they were blamed for some sort of disease that jeopardized the lumber industry.

      • Ranvier@sopuli.xyz
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        2 months ago

        They are now legal to grow in many states. Unfortunately still not going to find it in a grocery store most likely. I grow my own in the backyard so I can have some at least part of the year. They’re perennial, very easy to grow, and produce a ton of berries. Gooseberries were banned for similar reasons, but are now also legal in many states.

    • folekaule@lemmy.world
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      2 months ago

      Yes! As a Scandinavian living in the US: I would love to see black currant, red currant, and gooseberries in my grocery store.

  • ℕ𝕖𝕞𝕠@midwest.social
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    2 months ago

    You can’t import yuzu fruits or plants. All the yuzu in the US is descended from the 100 original plants imported before it was made illegal.

    But really, I want soft cheeses…

    • RBWells@lemmy.world
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      2 months ago

      We can get yuzu fruit here (Florida) but couldn’t get the seeds to sprout, not sure how the trees are propagated. Anyway - the fruit is underwhelming, the zest is divine, I made a yuzu kosho, it is delicious.

      • RBWells@lemmy.world
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        2 months ago

        Sort of Meyer lemon with lime zest? The ones I got were not juicy at all, and what juice they had, I would prefer lime. But the zest of the yuzu is amazing, I do like it. You can buy yuzu sake, or a yuzu soda, to taste the flavor. Yuzu kosho is very different, savory and spicy, i made mine with grated fresh jalapenos and fermented it, absolutely divine.

      • bitwaba@lemmy.world
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        2 months ago

        I’ve had it here in Europe.

        Personally, I think it tastes like a lemon that went bad. Like, kind of an uncanny valley thing. It’s close enough for me to think it’s one thing but far enough away from me to know it is definitely not what I want.

    • IMALlama@lemmy.world
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      2 months ago

      I suspect this is like our tomatoes. The tomatos you buy in stores were cultivated to be pretty, to get harvested by a machine, and to ship without getting damaged. Meanwhile, heirloom tomatoes will split their skin on a humid day, but they pack a ton more flavor in. The same is true for the vast majority of our fruit and veg. Actually ripened on plant produce doesn’t have a very long shelf life.

      • Aux@lemmy.world
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        2 months ago

        That’s not what heirloom tomatoes are. Heirloom means they’re not hybrids. There are loads of heirloom and hybrid varieties with all kinds of properties, flavours, shapes and sizes.

        • IMALlama@lemmy.world
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          2 months ago

          I was generalizing about heirlooms not being very easy to grow to modern standards. I grow a decent verity of heirlooms and hybrids and the hybrids don’t split nearly as often.

      • Aux@lemmy.world
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        2 months ago

        Also large tomatoes which split are usually classed as beefsteak tomatoes. There are heirlooms like Brandywine and hybrids like Brandy Boy. And if you don’t grow tomatoes yourself you’ll never know the difference.

        • IMALlama@lemmy.world
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          2 months ago

          And if you don’t grow tomatoes yourself you’ll never know the difference.

          What do you mean? Once you have home grown, or even farm stand, produce you realize that the vast majority of grocery store stuff is picked before it’s really ripe.

    • Alborlin@lemmy.world
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      2 months ago

      Oh there are like many varieties of mangoes z but hands down best is called hapoos or alphonso, it’s so so good. I recently found it EU due a colleague and tasted other varieties too such as kesar ( in think it means orange) , in could eat the peel also . The only place that you might get is Indian grocery stores in the areas specially now to end of julyi guess

  • Veraxus@lemmy.world
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    2 months ago

    All those different kinds of banana. All we get is cabendish which is, like, the worst of all the amazing banana varieties.

    • xkforce@lemmy.worldOP
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      2 months ago

      We have cavandish and red bananas here but none of the more interesting ones like the giant hawaiian cultivar etc. So completely agreed.

      • Pat_Riot@lemmy.today
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        2 months ago

        I think they meant to compare Cavendish bananas to the red delicious apple, which is red nut not delicious

        • xkforce@lemmy.worldOP
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          2 months ago

          I know. I was pointing out that banana selection is limited and arguably not very interesting here.

    • Altima NEO@lemmy.zip
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      2 months ago

      I’ve seen the big chain grocery stores carrying that around here. I have no idea how to eat it or anything though.

    • xkforce@lemmy.worldOP
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      2 months ago

      I remember getting one when one of the supermarkets around here carried them and theyre huge fruits. Probably 20 pound