• @GravitySpoiled@lemmy.ml
    link
    fedilink
    English
    1356 months ago

    The longer you use linux excluslively, you don’t think about windows or mac. You think about fedora or suse, kde or gnome, yay or apt, distrobox or toolbox.

    • @MrBubbles96@lemmy.ml
      link
      fedilink
      196 months ago

      That is…true, actually. The longer I use Linux, the more I’m like “…but what if, man, what if I ditch Arch for Fedora or NixOS or give Pop_OS! another chance (and i very well might when Cosmic launches)?” And sometimes I do…and then always come crawling back.

      Going back to Windows full time ain’t even crossed my mind for a hot minute. Partly because i have a spare driver running it for emergencies (that i barely use anyways, only because Windows literally runs one important app that I need, that I can’t run on Linux), and partly because going back means being stuck with Windows 11 again, and I really dislike Windows 11’s design choices, personally (and Microsoft in general, but i digress).

      • SaltySalamander
        link
        fedilink
        86 months ago

        going back means being stuck with Windows 11 again

        Windows 10 can 100% still be installed. I say that from a Win10 install.

        • @MrBubbles96@lemmy.ml
          link
          fedilink
          16 months ago

          Oh I know it can be installed, but after the headache I got re-installing 10 once before and then trying to get 11 running on…anything, really, i just decided “you know what? What will be will be at this point. I’m not gonna need it for much anyways.” when i finally got 11 to accept and install into a random external drive that i never really used (it didn’t like the one i had inside my PC reserved specifically for it. Somehow…).

          (Note: this was a while back, so installation could be a helluva lot better now and i have upgraded a bit since then but, shrug. Already got Windows ready to go on a drive, and only have it because I might need it moreso than me actually wanting to have it, so meh)

        • dog
          link
          fedilink
          16 months ago

          I can’t anymore. Leads to system crashing randomly. 11 works unfortunately.

  • @bionicjoey@lemmy.ca
    link
    fedilink
    636 months ago

    At a certain point I just feel like Linux isn’t designed to let me talk to God. All that bloat like networking and hardware drivers get in the way. I need to get away from the CIA mind control and return to something pure and simple. And when I feel that way, Based Terry is always there for me.

  • @CrabAndBroom@lemmy.ml
    link
    fedilink
    576 months ago

    Nothing TBH. I find Windows too stressful, Macs are too boring, and I can’t use TempleOS because I don’t have schizophrenia.

  • @rtxn@lemmy.world
    link
    fedilink
    English
    55
    edit-2
    6 months ago

    The fucking GTK file chooser. It’s like all application developers have made a pact with each other to never use a consistent UX, with the exception of having to press ctrl-L to edit the path textbox. It’s painful. And as much as I like XDP, support for it is spotty at best, and sometimes downright broken.

    I mean, who the FUCK puts the filesystem root in a submenu? Or sorts files and directories together? I just want to talk and explain why they’re beyond salvation.

    • @30p87@feddit.de
      link
      fedilink
      26 months ago

      I searched around for a bit, and apparently one could preload a library to replace the file dialog functions with an own, custom one, and I’d root for rofi (with a dmenu theme, kinda).

  • @Stillhart@lemm.ee
    link
    fedilink
    376 months ago

    I feel like this post is guerilla marketing for “TempleOS”, which I’ve never heard of before and will absolutely not be looking up after this.

    • Illecors
      link
      fedilink
      English
      576 months ago

      It’s not. TempleOS is a famous from scratch OS created by a guy with serious mental illness. It’s a sad story, but the capability of that guy was incredible. He’s gone now :(

    • @Euphoma@lemmy.ml
      link
      fedilink
      English
      436 months ago

      TempleOS (wikipedia) is a meme os. It’s supposed to be god’s os and was singlehandedly coded by the late Terry Davis. So this post isn’t really marketing, and the reference is just supposed to be humorous.

    • @LeFantome@programming.dev
      link
      fedilink
      146 months ago

      I love this reaction and how dramatically out of sync it is with what TempleOS actually is. I know it is innocent and accidental so this is in no way a shot at the poster. It is just a hilariously wrong take.

    • billwashere
      link
      fedilink
      English
      86 months ago

      I have looked it up and to include it in that list is just downright ludicrous. Let me give you some quotes from the wiki

      “The system was characterized as a modern x86-64 Commodore 64, using an interface similar to a mixture of DOS and Turbo C.”

      “TempleOS (formerly J Operating System, LoseThos, and SparrowOS) is a biblical-themed lightweight operating system (OS) designed to be the Third Temple prophesied in the Bible. It was created by American programmer Terry A. Davis, who developed it alone over the course of a decade after a series of manic episodes that he later described as a revelation from God.”

      “The system was characterized as a modern x86-64 Commodore 64, using an interface similar to a mixture of DOS and Turbo C. Davis proclaimed that the system’s features, such as its 640x480 resolution, 16-color display, and single-voice audio, were designed according to explicit instructions from God.”

      What the actual fuck?!?

  • grimacefry
    link
    fedilink
    266 months ago

    It is surprisingly hard to run Android apps on Linux, despite Android itself being Linux based. Being able to run Android apps quickly and natively would be a game changer for Linux, resolving long standing issues of app availability. Hell you could even then use Android version of Microsoft Office etc. This should be a higher priority for all distros.

    Until then, there are apps that are simply unavailable on Linux, even with Wine support, that necessitate using Windows or macOS.

    • @rotopenguin@infosec.pub
      link
      fedilink
      English
      96 months ago

      Because it is quite possibly the last of its kind - a desktop OS that was built from scratch by one person with one (strange) vision. Everything else has a lineage to AT&T Unix or CP/M.

      • @LeFantome@programming.dev
        link
        fedilink
        4
        edit-2
        6 months ago

        There are a surprising number of one person OS projects, many of them more useable than TempleOS.

        What makes TempleOS unique is the fame of its creator, sadly largely as the result of his mental illness. His story also explains how it was able to become so famous while also not attracting contributors.

        Other OS projects either stay obscure or, if they become widely known, they attract contributors. SerenityOS is an example of what was a single man effort but is now a reasonably large and thriving community. It has become self-sustaining enough that the founder largely focussed on the web browser these days with the OS connoting to move forward largely via the work of others ( including ports to other architectures ).

        I think part of what you are saying though is that most other projects aim for POSIX compliance and that is true. There are some that don’t but, as above, that tends to keep them obscure.

  • @GustavoM@lemmy.world
    link
    fedilink
    English
    226 months ago

    Nah, I’m 100% done with Windows. Even if good ol’ Bill comes up with something that forces me to use Windows for whatever reason, Linux will always be in my routine thanks to single board computers.

  • @dino
    link
    English
    226 months ago

    a gun to the head

  • @yoevli@lemmy.world
    link
    fedilink
    English
    206 months ago

    I’m approaching the point where I’m seriously considering buying a spare drive for a Windows install exclusively for VR. I’m currently dealing with 3 separate serious issues with SteamVR on Linux, one of which I sometimes can’t even work around depending on how it’s feeling that day. Not to mention, every new release lately seems to introduce a new problem.

    I haven’t had a Windows install on my system since my previous SSD died 2 or 3 years ago, but it’s getting to the point where it’s more trouble than it’s worth.

    • @Octorine@midwest.social
      link
      fedilink
      English
      36 months ago

      This is why I have a windows box. I’m hoping when they finally release SteamOS 3 for PC it will have stable SteamVR support.

      • @Euphoma@lemmy.ml
        link
        fedilink
        English
        10
        edit-2
        6 months ago

        It’s not fully supported: https://old.reddit.com/r/ValveIndex/comments/zs8snv/vr_on_linux_makes_me_sad/

        No async reprojection

        No bluetooth support for base stations power management

        Does not work on Wayland, at all (Nobara, KDE)

        Lacks the ability for you to continue using your headset if for some reason it disconnects and reconnects (base stations will not be detected, neither will any bluetooth adapters like the SW7)

        A plethora of bugs

        It feels like my headset view is on a delay? Maybe due to no async reprojection

        I’m quoting this guy because I think that VR straight up doesn’t work on NixOS, and I haven’t gotten to testing my Index on any other os yet.

        https://xeiaso.net/blog/nixos-vr-hell-2021-12-02/ <- It seems this guy wasn’t able to get VR working on NixOS either.

        • @yoevli@lemmy.world
          link
          fedilink
          English
          56 months ago

          To Valve’s credit, since that post they did implement base station power management and some DEs now implement Wayland’s DRM leasing protocol, and there’s a somewhat buggy async reproduction implementation in place (although it’s broken in SteamVR 2.0 onwards).

      • @yoevli@lemmy.world
        link
        fedilink
        English
        4
        edit-2
        6 months ago

        It most certainly is not. Besides the missing features mentioned by the other commenter, SteamVR 2.1 literally shipped last week with a bug that caused it to completely stop functioning on Linux. I think the hotfix version still isn’t in the release channel. There’s another bug still present in 2.1.7 that prevents VR games from starting. SteamVR Home doesn’t work at all anymore.

        2.0 had an issue where vrdashboard was using the wrong pixel format which caused the red and blue channels to be swapped (pretty sure that made it into the release channel), and there was a regression introduced in the last year (and is still yet to be fixed) that causes vrdashboard to be rendered to the controller instead of the battery indicator. Granted, these are more minor issues, but it shows the level of QA that goes into the Linux version (next to none).

        • @yoevli@lemmy.world
          link
          fedilink
          English
          26 months ago

          The parent comment is not correct. The Index paired with SteamVR on Linux has a plethora of issues and sometimes doesn’t work at all. It’s usually possible to get it working through some combination of switching SteamVR versions and rebooting, but it’s never a guarantee and usually takes a good chunk of time to get sorted when it’s being temperamental.

  • pinchcramp
    link
    fedilink
    196 months ago

    The ease of buying a quality laptop without having to worry about if it will run well with my OS.

    I’ve been using MacOS for about 8 years at work and I never really taken to it. It’s fine and I can do my work but I won’t use it if I hadn’t to (unless the only alternative was Windows). But one thing I really like about Macs is that you can buy one and you won’t have any headaches with battery life, software compatibility etc. You get decent hardware (let’s ignore the whole 8GB on an M3 = 16GB on other machine debacle) and know that it will work decently well with 3rd party software/hardware and if something breaks you can just bring into an Apple store.

    While there are dedicated Linux sellers (System76, Tuxedo Computeres, Starlabs), I’m hesitant to spend 2k on a computer just to find out that the build quality is subpar, the battery life sucks or that customer support will just ignore my requests (read some bad experiences on the Starlabs subreddit).

  • @5714@lemmy.dbzer0.com
    link
    fedilink
    136 months ago

    Low performance of very specific games made by small studios on middle-aged low-budget hardware makes me consider dual-booting, but then I remember that I hate closed-source, software-as-a-service, tracking-financed operating systems.