• frickineh@lemmy.world
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    7 months ago

    Most of them? Generics are frequently the same thing from the same manufacturer with cheaper packaging and no/very little marketing. There are very few things I’ve ever tried that were noticeably better in the name brand.

    • HubertManne@kbin.social
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      7 months ago

      I was going to say everything. I mean its not everything but if you don’t know its always best to give them a try if the price difference is good and if you don’t like it then thats one of the few things not to get. Especially now. generics used to be pretty meh but man now they are sometimes better. Oh man dominicks had this store brand chunky peanut butter that I have not been able to find an equal to since they closed.

      • teegus@sh.itjust.works
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        7 months ago

        Sometimes store brands/generics have lower meat content for example, if you buy, say, meat balls or fish products. While other products are literally the same just with another logo. Always check the ingredients (at least in my country they give a lot of information)

        • HubertManne@kbin.social
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          7 months ago

          oh I always compare the ingredients just like price per unit. Im one of those folks who forgets to mention things like this so thanks.

          • vrek@programming.dev
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            7 months ago

            As long as your not a former roommate of mine. He would calculate price per slice of bread and buy the cheapest. He would do this for everything and would take hours shopping…

            • HubertManne@kbin.social
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              7 months ago

              Im not that bad but I do sorta consider it a puzzle game. Sorta a “fun” math activity to keep my brain active like doing suduko. Honestly I don’t see a point at price per slice as you would just get really thinly sliced bread. Should be per ounce. Honestly bread is one of those things I spring for the xspenciv stuff in the bakery section or I will do one of the fancy brownberry type with oats and nuts or potato.

              • vrek@programming.dev
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                7 months ago

                I understand where you come but I do sympathize with him(he had 4 kids from 2 mother’s so money was always tight). He took FOREVER shopping though.

                One time we went shopping together, I got all my food, checked out, drove home, put all my food away, took a shower, watched a show on Netflix, drove back to the store and he said “almost done, 10 more minutes”…

      • Poik@pawb.social
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        7 months ago

        Interesting. Outside of chips, I’ve had a lot of luck with Private Selection (Kroger’s no name brand). I’ve had quality issues with Food Lion and Walmart’s perishables, but not as often with Kroger. Kroger’s non perishables don’t seem to be much different than Walmart’s though.

        • Artyom@lemm.ee
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          7 months ago

          Private Selection isn’t bad, I was referring to Kroger brand as in it actually says Kroger, which is a suffering I wish on no one. It’s also worth noting that Private Selection is a substantial bump in price over plain Kroger brand.

          • Poik@pawb.social
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            7 months ago

            Still pretty cheap, but yeah. I’ve had little from the Kroger line that I’d buy again, so that’s fair enough.

      • espy@lemmy.world
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        7 months ago

        As far as I know Hydrox isn’t a generic, it was the original brand. Oreo was an imitation and came later, but store brands/generic even later

        • Rhynoplaz@lemmy.world
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          7 months ago

          You are 100% correct. This commenter seems to have confused “generic” with “competition”.

    • schmidtster@lemmy.world
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      7 months ago

      That’s a placebo affect. Most generics are stuff that don’t meet the standards of the name brand, but is still fine to sell. Kind of a form of downcycling.

      • frickineh@lemmy.world
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        7 months ago

        I don’t know that placebo is the right word (or if you just pulled that info out of your ass) but even if it was, if people consume the generic and just feel like it was the same, then who cares? It’s not like people are buying Kirkland chemotherapy, it’s some cookies or lotion or whatever, and our feelings about those things are totally subjective anyway.

        • burchalka@lemmy.world
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          7 months ago

          And even with medicine - not sure about cancer treatments, but headaches cured fine with generic ibuprofen vs more expensive Nurofen™ or similar

      • Neato@kbin.social
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        7 months ago

        There’s way WAY too many generic and store brands for them all to just be QC rejects.

        • LinkOpensChest.wav@lemmy.one
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          7 months ago

          They’re not. I have celiac, and I’ve learned from reading labels that they often have completely different ingredients/manufacturing conditions.

          They’re not QC rejects, but they’re also not the same thing repackaged.

            • LinkOpensChest.wav@lemmy.one
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              7 months ago

              My provider claims generics can have different fillers and such. The active ingredients have to be the same, though.

              If I really wanted to be sure, I’d ask a pharmacist.

              • vrek@programming.dev
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                7 months ago

                Yeah that’s my understanding too but it’s like preferring McDonald’s over McBurger because they get the bag from a different distributor

          • Honytawk@lemmy.zip
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            7 months ago

            Usually it is just cheaper ingredients but made in the same factory, and branded with a different label.

            • LinkOpensChest.wav@lemmy.one
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              7 months ago

              See, this is what people say, but now that I’ve been reading labels I don’t believe it.

              For example, I cannot eat Kellogg’s Rice Krispies, but some off brands are made with a different formula that doesn’t include gluten and is manufactured in a safe environment.

              Conversely, I can eat Cheerios, but not most store brands, Lucky Charms but not most store brands, etc.

              And that’s just cereal! Even drugs vary wildly. Sure, the active ingredients are the same, but the other contents can really vary.

              Some foods have similar ingredients, but are either manufactured on shared equipment with wheat and dairy, or not.

              I now believe that most store brands are made in a unique environment. I’m open to being convinced otherwise, but if you need more examples, I can check my cupboard and tell you all kinds of things!

      • squiblet@kbin.social
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        7 months ago

        It’s more common that they’re made by factories during what otherwise would be their downtime, like a production run wedged in at night.

  • jws_shadotak@sh.itjust.works
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    7 months ago

    Any drugs. If you’re not familiar with medications, just look at the active ingredients. They’re most likely the same or very similar dosages.

    Also, sleep aids are usually just diphenhydramine, aka Benadryl.

    • char*@lemmy.blahaj.zone
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      7 months ago

      I’m not a doctor or a pharmacist. But just because it has the same ingredients doesn’t mean it is the same. The way the medication is packaged, what fillers it has, etc. may have an impact on the way it works. Anecdotally I’ve heard of people having a different reaction to namebrand and generic because of some of these factors.

      • dmention7@lemm.ee
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        7 months ago

        Good point, and worth keeping in mind! At the same time, the generics are often so much cheaper it’s worth a try. I take Claratin daily for allergies and the Costco version is literally 10% the cost of name brand. It’s astounding how much of a markup basic OTC drugs can have.

      • squiblet@kbin.social
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        7 months ago

        It’s even more exciting in GMO-produced drugs like insulin where there are no generics, just ‘biosimilars’ because they’re not made by the exact same strain of yeast/bacteria. Also then the excipients vary from brand to brand. For some reason some people have almost no effect from one insulin compared to another.

      • wheeldawg@sh.itjust.works
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        7 months ago

        This is common knowledge.

        This is why a lot of insurances only cover the brand name ones if there is a problem with the generic.

    • garbagebagel@lemmy.world
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      7 months ago

      Vitamins and health supplements too. My mom works at a pretty big brand name one of them and they literally package the exact same stuff for a generic brand that’s half the price.

  • Sewer_King@lemmy.world
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    7 months ago

    The store by me has their own brand of pop-tart that’s got more icing and filling as well as being half the cost. They don’t have as many flavors, but they’re not shrinkflated to the point of being a sad cookie. Shout out to Meijer toaster pastries.

  • NJA@lemmy.world
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    7 months ago

    Really as long as they are labeled correctly and not like dairy treat vs ice cream it’s probably fine

    • givesomefucks@lemmy.world
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      7 months ago

      labeled correctly and not like dairy treat vs ice cream

      I mean, that is labeled correctly…

      Something to do with milk fat percentages. And since it’s (relatively) expensive, once you go cheap enough they stop using it and legally can’t call it ice cream. There’s not enough cream to meet the legal definition

    • Cethin@lemmy.zip
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      7 months ago

      Yeah, for me just about any consumable I buy store brand for. They’re pretty much equal the name brand (if not sometimes better). There are some exceptions, but as long as they’re the same product, they’re probably produced in the same factory even.

  • tal@lemmy.today
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    7 months ago

    I’d say the other way around. The store brand version has nearly always been fine, in my experience. I’d instead use the store brand and make a list of cases where the store brand isn’t okay. At least in my experience, it’s pretty limited. What I can recall having bad experiences with, off-the-cuff:

    • Soup. I have had some pretty disappointing store brand canned soups.

    • Things with motors, like small kitchen appliances, blenders and the like. I’ve had a bunch of generic ones of those fail before.

    • Sodas. These aren’t exactly the same. Some people particularly prefer the taste of one root beer or whatever, and it might be that they prefer a name brand. That being said, there are also people who prefer store brands, so…shrugs

    There are also a few cases where I’ve run into a particular brand that doesn’t have a store clone, and where I really like the name-brand product.

    • Pretzels. I particularly like Dot’s. I haven’t seen a store brand clone of Dot’s.

    • Sardines. Bit of a niche, but I once went on some website with some guy that was absolutely rabid about sardines, reviewed them, wrote huge amounts about them. My dad always liked eating canned sardines on crackers. Tried a couple different brands, and yeah, there is a difference, but the big one is that stores in the US don’t normally have heavily-smoked sardines (well, okay, sprats) in oil. I started eating Latvian “Riga Gold” sprats in oil, and they’re just amazing. I don’t like a lot of foods I’ve tried from Eastern Europe, but man, they hit it out of the ballpark on that. I don’t think that we have a US-based comparable manufacturer.

    • Red Windsor cheese. It’s not all that fancy, just cheddar with some port wine marbled in, but I really like the taste. Same thing on this – I don’t think that there are any companies in the US that make the stuff, so it’s name brand or nothing.

    If someone did clone any of the last three, though, I’d give 'em a try.

    • chaogomu@kbin.social
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      7 months ago

      I’ll piggyback on your comment with Worcestershire sauce.

      Lea & Perrins make the original Worcestershire sauce, they also have never disclosed the full recipe, just the ingredients.

      There are store brands and even Heinz makes a sauce. None of them are as good as the original.

        • chaogomu@kbin.social
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          7 months ago

          Heinz is particularly bad, they use soy sauce and corn syrup, and I don’t think ferment it at all.

          Whereas Lea & Perrins use zero soy, and ferment the sauce.

          The absolute worst part about it all is that Lea & Perrins was bought out by Heinz in 2005, and yet the Heinz branded sauce is still shit flavored water.

          The original is still made the same way, and is still good.

          • snooggums@kbin.social
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            7 months ago

            The absolute worst part about it all is that Lea & Perrins was bought out by Heinz in 2005, and yet the Heinz branded sauce is still shit flavored water.

            No, this is the best part because L&Ps product didn’t go to shit after getting bought out.

      • tal@lemmy.today
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        7 months ago

        That’s a good point. A number of sauces/mixed condiments in general are kind of like sodas. There are definitely competitors, but they all have slightly different variants, even within the same field. And people seem to have definite preferences on the specific variant.

        Like, the Brits have that brown sauce stuff.

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brown_sauce

        HP Sauce is the earliest brown sauce, and is the most popular brown sauce in the United Kingdom, accounting for around 75% of sales. Daddies, OK Sauce and Wilkin & Sons are other popular brands. Another is Hammonds of Yorkshire,[8] popular in Northern England.[9]

        Most supermarket chains in the UK[10] and Ireland also stock their own brand of brown sauce.

    • Shadow@lemmy.ca
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      7 months ago

      Mac and cheese is another with significant variety in flavor between brands.

      • Bonehead@kbin.social
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        7 months ago

        Honestly, while not exactly the same, the Walmart Great Value Mac and Cheese is almost identical to Kraft Dinner. Slightly different noodles, and the cheese powder is fairly pale compared to the striking yellow name brand stuff, but once the milk and butter is mixed in the colour comes out and it looks and tastes pretty damn close.

  • Son_of_dad@lemmy.world
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    7 months ago

    Recently I’ve been buying the grocery store brand cereals. They’re half the price and I honestly find them tastier and made with better ingredients. Kellogg’s quality has gone down the drain and it’s really noticeable when you switch over.

  • Emi621@lemmy.blahaj.zone
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    7 months ago

    Personally I don’t care about brand names but about quality, as long as it’s not shit just buy the cheaper options. Mostly the brand stuff isn’t worth it, at least here in Czech republic but here’s whole different problem with us getting all the shittiest products from EU.

  • uphillbothways@kbin.social
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    7 months ago

    Honestly, i’ve always approached this question the reverse of how it’s posed here. Pretty much every store brand whatever is just fine.
    But, picking a few fancier versions of things as exceptions is nice sometimes.

    Lately for me, Kingdom aged organic cheddar and Kerrygold butter have been my indulgences. I don’t eat much dairy, so they last me a long time. They’re loaded with flavor. And, it’s just nice to have a few things that feel special.

  • Wazzamatter@lemmy.world
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    7 months ago

    In Canada, No Name Brand. All the products are in non eye-catching packaging, and are quite cheap. They are quite popular with the college and university housing crowds.

  • WhoisJohnGalt@lemmy.world
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    7 months ago

    I guess you need to define “fine”. Most things are fine to buy but some name brand items are, in my opinion, worth spending more on.

    For example, for me it’s certain condiments and spices. Red pepper flakes by a name brand such as McCormick just taste better and have a more potent flavor. Buying a generic brand is just “fine” - it gives a good kick to food - but it doesn’t nearly taste the same or is as flavorful as the name brand. In my opinion!

    • Crashumbc@lemmy.world
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      7 months ago

      Lol, just a FYI about McCormick they also produce the generic spices on the exact same lines with the exact same spices as their own brand.

      I worked on the ground pepper line, the ONLY difference between McCormick and the black white 4oz cans was the amount that was considered “acceptable”. Brand name was kicked off it was under filled below 3.75 while generic cans could be 3.5 oz and still considered acceptable.

      • tal@lemmy.today
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        7 months ago

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Price_discrimination

        Price discrimination is a microeconomic pricing strategy where identical or largely similar goods or services are sold at different prices by the same provider in different market segments.[1][2][3] Price discrimination is distinguished from product differentiation by the more substantial difference in production cost for the differently priced products involved in the latter strategy.[3] Price differentiation essentially relies on the variation in the customers’ willingness to pay[2][3][4] and in the elasticity of their demand. For price discrimination to succeed, a firm must have market power, such as a dominant market share, product uniqueness, sole pricing power, etc.[5] All prices under price discrimination are higher than the equilibrium price in a perfectly competitive market. However, some prices under price discrimination may be lower than the price charged by a single-price monopolist. Price discrimination is utilised by the monopolist to recapture some deadweight loss.[6] This Pricing strategy enables firms to capture additional consumer surplus and maximize their profits while benefiting some consumers at lower prices. Price discrimination can take many forms and is prevalent in many industries, from education and telecommunications to healthcare.[7]

        In a theoretical market with perfect information, perfect substitutes, and no transaction costs or prohibition on secondary exchange (or re-selling) to prevent arbitrage, price discrimination can only be a feature of monopoly and oligopoly markets,[19] where market power can be exercised (see ‘Price discrimination and monopoly power’ below for more in-depth explanation). Without market power when the price is differentiated higher than the market equilibrium consumers will move to buy from other producers selling at the market equilibrium.[20] Moreover, when the seller tries to sell the same good at differentiating prices, the buyer at the lower price can arbitrage by selling to the consumer buying at the higher price with a small discount from the higher price.[21]

        You’re undermining their reliance on consumers not having perfect information there.

  • dmention7@lemm.ee
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    7 months ago

    Breakfast cereal 100%

    I’d go out of my way to buy Malt-o-Meal cereals even if they weren’t cheaper. Marshmallow Mateys 4 Lyfe!

    • Riven@lemmy.dbzer0.com
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      7 months ago

      I don’t recommend the generic for mini wheats though. I tried it, and as someone who always seeks the store brand for stuff I was not impressed.

      • IMongoose@lemmy.world
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        7 months ago

        I actually like the generic mini wheats better. I much prefer the generic cinnamon toasts too. The name brands taste weird to me now, like they have too much iron in them or something. Tastes metallic to me.

        • wjrii@kbin.social
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          7 months ago

          With the mini wheats, there are also a few different styles, mostly in how finely shredded the fibers (or whatever) are, how they’re compressed, what the size is, and the thickness of the frosting. Like, the Post is barely the same cereal as the Kellogg’s, and the store brands play around with the ratios too. It’s really a matter of preference.

    • TAG@lemmy.world
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      7 months ago

      I like store brand oat loops more than Cheerios. I feel like they are less powdery.

  • grasshopper_mouse@lemmy.world
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    7 months ago

    Store brand frozen vegetables and canned vegetables are fine, however I’ve found that there’s a huge difference in quality where canned beans are concerned. Generic refried beans are just awful, as are generic baked beans.

    • garbagebagel@lemmy.world
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      7 months ago

      Refried beans are one of those items that need to be a very specific brand (la costeña obviously). Other bean brands are ok but nothing ever comes close.

    • zzzz@lemmy.world
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      7 months ago

      Green beans, also. Mostly, it’s the texture and how good a job was done removing all the stems.

  • Professorozone@lemmy.world
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    7 months ago

    I find many of my store brand (Publix) products are as good or better than the leading brands. Not all, but many.

    But if you need a specific one, I’d say yellow mustard.