I hear “No problem” far more often.

  • pruwyben
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    2 months ago

    Years ago, I had to do customer service training for a job, and one thing they said is to always say “you’re welcome” instead of “no problem”, because some people think “no problem” is rude. But I think it’s a generational thing, and it’s kind of the opposite with younger folks.

    • lanolinoil@lemmy.world
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      2 months ago

      Nothing is worse than other options though like Chic fil a’s mandated “my pleasure”

      • Snot Flickerman@lemmy.blahaj.zone
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        2 months ago

        When a chic-fil-a worker hits you with that, you gotta one-up them with “No! The pleasure is all mine!” and then hit the gas, peeling out cackling because you stole that pleasure motherfuckaaaaah.

        (Or better, don’t go to chic-fil-a)

        • Zeppo@sh.itjust.works
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          2 months ago

          I told a bartender “oh, the pleasure was all ours!” one time just sort of joking around and he said “you have no idea how much”. I wasn’t really sure how to take that.

            • Zeppo@sh.itjust.works
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              2 months ago

              Yeah, I saw a few intepretations:

              • he was joking
              • he hates his job and all of the customers
              • he hated us in particular (there’d be no reason why though, my gf and I showed up, had a couple glasses of wine, didn’t complain that one had gnats in it, got rained on on the patio, went inside and paid and I had just finished tipping 25-30%)
    • Mongostein@lemmy.ca
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      2 months ago

      I think we collectively decided that “you’re welcome” doesn’t make sense. Welcome to what??

        • Pandantic@midwest.social
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          2 months ago

          Implying that it was an effort, but you are welcome to it. Whereas “no problem” denotes that the effort is was not a problem for me to do. I use them interchangeably - “you’re welcome” as a response to a complement, or something where there was moderate effort put into the task; “no problem” when the task was low effort (“Thanks for responding to that email so quickly”) or I feel my effort was obliged (helping pick up after a meeting).

          • intensely_human@lemm.ee
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            2 months ago

            Actually “no problem” implies that the thing would normally be a problem, but that you are negating that.

            It’s like saying “No visible bruising”. There’s the implication something happened that might have caused bruising.

            • Pandantic@midwest.social
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              2 months ago

              Disagree, no problem is saying that what you are thanking me for was not a problem for me to do.

              Honestly, I think this perception is the disconnect between millennials thinking it’s better and boomers thinking it’s rude - two different perspectives of what it means.

              Also, don’t ackchyually me on an opinion.

      • intensely_human@lemm.ee
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        2 months ago

        Welcome to what??

        Isn’t that obvious? You’re welcome to the thing you received. The thing you are thanking them for.

      • ettyblatant@lemmy.world
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        2 months ago

        Maybe it’s “you are welcome (to ask me for help/favors, as I am neutral to the task. I might even enjoy it.)”

        And “it’s not a problem (for me to do what you asked me to do; we have now both acknowledged that I have done something to help you that was not organic to me, but now we can move past it with no further conversation.)”

        I bet “no problem” to some people is like seeing someone wear a T-shirt to church. They’d really prefer it if you would put on a suit and tie, even though the purpose of both are the same (cover my body when away from home because that is our current social agreement), because a T-shirt is disrespectful.

        Also everyone sucks, it is a problem, and you are not welcome.

    • Nyanix@lemmy.ca
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      2 months ago

      I think a lot of younger generation, myself included, prefer casual responses, conflating professionalism with being rude, slimy, or otherwise malintentioned

    • illi@lemm.ee
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      2 months ago

      I had to do one communucation trainung where the trainer saud that saying “no problem” should not be used, because it implies there might’ve been a problem. I was not convinced though.

      • blackbrook@mander.xyz
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        2 months ago

        Then “your welcome” implies you might not be welcome. Seems like either both work or both are problematic, he can’t have it both ways.

        • illi@lemm.ee
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          2 months ago

          Agreed. Might also be because “problem” is a word with negative conotation? Idk, I don’t see a problem (hah) myself

      • EveryMuffinIsNowEncrypted@lemmy.blahaj.zone
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        2 months ago

        Wow. facepalm The words literally say there’s no problem, and yet it somehow implies there is a problem? Talk about overthinking what someone is saying.

        This is why I often hate neurotypical communication styles. The world would be a lot more straightforward if people just said what they meant. Jesus fucking Christ on a motorbike…

      • MrsDoyle@lemmy.world
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        2 months ago

        Someone said that to me just the other day! That saying “no problem” implies there might be a problem. Crazy. I’m thinking of switching to “well it was quite an imposition on my time and energy to help you out, especially given you’re not paying me, but I’ll let it slide this time because you seem like an ok person and I’m in a good mood” just to annoy them.

        • intensely_human@lemm.ee
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          2 months ago

          I doubt that would annoy them more than “no problem” since it is perfectly in line with what they think you’re saying by “no problem”.

    • Empricorn@feddit.nl
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      2 months ago

      During my years in retail exactly one customer ever had a problem with me saying “no problem”. He also said he was an assassin. That’s not a joke. This old, fat boomer said I shouldn’t say ‘no problem’ because some people might take it to mean ‘yes problem’ and then told me he kills people for a living.

      That’s the stability of people that can’t understand the meaning of words. If I go to a police station and say I am a serial killer vs I’m not a serial killer, I don’t expect them to react the same…

    • littlewonder@lemmy.world
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      2 months ago

      I’ve been making an effort to use “happy to help” at work, instead of “no problem” because I was also informed it’s a generational thing.

      • sping@lemmy.sdf.org
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        2 months ago

        For paid service I like the simple “of course” recognizing that is what I’m here for and it’s normal. No faux generosity nor implication of a tolerated imposition.