• Hildegarde@lemmy.world
    link
    fedilink
    arrow-up
    163
    arrow-down
    7
    ·
    1 month ago

    Imagine designing a bicycle without triangles. Every joint needs to be overbuilt, because there’s no structure from the geometry. But you make sure it still has a top tube, so its just as hard to mount and dismount as a normal bike. Incredible!

    • Kecessa@sh.itjust.works
      link
      fedilink
      arrow-up
      95
      arrow-down
      4
      ·
      edit-2
      1 month ago

      Right? Who would be crazy enough to do that?

      Next you’re going to tell me someone will make one without a top tube?

      • dejected_warp_core@lemmy.world
        link
        fedilink
        arrow-up
        99
        ·
        1 month ago

        Hey, look here buddy. You can’t be your own comment thread and post all the plausible responses yourself like that. You’re putting all the trolls out of work.

      • pyre@lemmy.world
        link
        fedilink
        arrow-up
        14
        ·
        1 month ago

        doesn’t that prove their point? they all look overbuilt, as the original commenter said.

        • Kecessa@sh.itjust.works
          link
          fedilink
          arrow-up
          5
          ·
          edit-2
          1 month ago

          Carbon fiber, aerodynamics…

          For this one it’s used as suspension (not carbon fiber)

          Not that rare in old mountain bikes either, pretty sure my old steel Raleigh was similar

          • Natanael@slrpnk.net
            link
            fedilink
            arrow-up
            1
            arrow-down
            1
            ·
            1 month ago

            Carbon fiber has very limited lifetimes when used for something with a lot of hard impacts, so if you’re not sticking to smooth surfaces the bike can literally split apart with little warning

              • Natanael@slrpnk.net
                link
                fedilink
                arrow-up
                4
                arrow-down
                1
                ·
                1 month ago

                I Googled “motorcycle carbon fiber wheel” and autocomplete immediately suggested adding “failure” and doing that search has endless relevant results

                • Kecessa@sh.itjust.works
                  link
                  fedilink
                  arrow-up
                  3
                  ·
                  edit-2
                  1 month ago

                  And if I do a research for “Toyota Tercel engine failure” I find tons of results as well even though it’s one of the most reliable car ever built.

                  Crazy how search engines show you results for what you’re looking for, right?

      • Hildegarde@lemmy.world
        link
        fedilink
        arrow-up
        8
        arrow-down
        11
        ·
        1 month ago

        The meme shows only bikes with flat handlebars, like commuter bikes intended for transportation.

        Every bike you posted are high performance racing bikes with specialized aerodynamic handlebars.

        Different priorities. Triangless bikes with a top bar is not a good idea for commuter bicicles like the ones in the meme.

        • Kecessa@sh.itjust.works
          link
          fedilink
          arrow-up
          20
          arrow-down
          1
          ·
          1 month ago

          I still showed that it’s perfectly possible to build a bike without a seat tube, hell I’m sure we can find 90s examples that weren’t high performance bikes.

      • bcron@lemmy.world
        link
        fedilink
        arrow-up
        7
        arrow-down
        1
        ·
        1 month ago

        Compliance but this is a very very extreme example - you’d hit a bump and the top tube would flex, kinda like a diving board, and smooth out the harshness. I’m not even sure this bike exists but that would be the practical purpose of such a design, but most manufacturers tend to go after the seat stays (Salsa Warbird, Bianchi with Counterveil, Moots Routt YBB) or decouple the seat tube from the top tube and allow it to flex due to seat tube angle (Trek Isospeed). Carbon’s kinda fickle and engineers are constantly trying to figure out how to finesse it into feeling less jarring and rigid

        • Wogi@lemmy.world
          link
          fedilink
          arrow-up
          15
          ·
          1 month ago

          This bike does not exist. This is part of a series of theoretical renders from what must be 15 to 20 years ago. When carbon fiber was kind of a new material to the general consumer. The premise was they could not only reduce the weight of the material but because carbon fiber was this space age super material that could melt your tits off if you looked at it sideways, that they could also reduce the need for structural materials like spokes and triangles. Making a featherweight racing bike. Most of the designs had absolutely no way to steer them.

          • bcron@lemmy.world
            link
            fedilink
            arrow-up
            3
            ·
            1 month ago

            I was gonna say, the frame just looks a little too outlandish, totally ignoring the wheels and headset.

            Once in a while a bike comes along trying to reinvent the triangle but none are particularly good, often worse than tried and true. Superstrata Classic is a perfect example. Making a 2 triangle frame and adding just a hair of compliance around less-critical spots seems to be the winning formula

      • uis@lemm.ee
        link
        fedilink
        arrow-up
        1
        ·
        1 month ago

        At compressing part of bend. If I remember correctly, carbon fibers are good at handling tensile loads and terrible at compression loads.

    • XEAL@lemm.ee
      link
      fedilink
      arrow-up
      4
      ·
      1 month ago

      Nah, but that tube is a little lowered, enough to make a difference.

  • Nougat@fedia.io
    link
    fedilink
    arrow-up
    97
    ·
    1 month ago

    I wonder how many revolutions the wheels will do before they bend into pretzels.

    • Dabundis@lemmy.world
      link
      fedilink
      arrow-up
      48
      ·
      1 month ago

      Also the pedals driving the outside of the back wheel puts a pretty heavy limit on the gear ratio

    • Cuck4Mai@lemmynsfw.com
      link
      fedilink
      arrow-up
      36
      arrow-down
      5
      ·
      1 month ago

      No springs or shocks means however many it takes, it will be the most painful ass-blasting ride until they do.

      • yamsham@lemm.ee
        link
        fedilink
        arrow-up
        22
        ·
        1 month ago

        I mean not necessarily. Road bikes pretty much never have any actual suspension, all the comfort comes from tire and frame flex. This bike has some fairly chunky tires on, and the way the seat post is just suspended off the back I’ll bet that frame flexes a ton.

        That being said, you’d still have to fine tune the design, and get the right amount of flex in the right ways. I kinda doubt anyone choosing to make a bike like this would have the competency to do that

    • Xtallll@lemmy.blahaj.zone
      link
      fedilink
      English
      arrow-up
      18
      ·
      1 month ago

      Id put my money on the wheel mount failing because the whole wheel turns into a lever trying to break it every time it hits a bump.

  • EmperorHenry
    link
    fedilink
    arrow-up
    81
    arrow-down
    1
    ·
    1 month ago

    That looks like it would be extremely unreliable and needlessly expensive to maintain. Maybe even impossible for the average person to maintain it

      • Aganim@lemmy.world
        link
        fedilink
        arrow-up
        13
        ·
        edit-2
        1 month ago

        Yup, that went well for Van Moof owners in the Netherlands. Also hipster bikes, the latest model turned out to be of dubious quality and was built using all custom parts. They had fun times getting their ridiculously overpriced bikes repaired after the company went belly up.

        • Obi@sopuli.xyz
          link
          fedilink
          arrow-up
          6
          ·
          1 month ago

          The whole van moof thing was absolutely hilarious tbh (if you didn’t buy one, I mean).

        • uis@lemm.ee
          link
          fedilink
          arrow-up
          3
          ·
          1 month ago

          I hope Netherlands will litigate good Right to Repair into existance. Netherlands is part of EU, so I belive in you.

    • BruceTwarzen@lemm.ee
      link
      fedilink
      arrow-up
      15
      arrow-down
      1
      ·
      1 month ago

      It’s so shit. There is a kickstarter of an ebike like that and it’s worse than you van ever imagine. It’s LOUD as fuck and worse in every way than a normal bike.

        • Kacarott@feddit.de
          link
          fedilink
          English
          arrow-up
          12
          ·
          1 month ago

          I mean it does look cool.

          Next time I have a bunch of extra cash to throw at a decorative art piece I’ll consider it

      • Etterra@lemmy.world
        link
        fedilink
        arrow-up
        5
        arrow-down
        1
        ·
        1 month ago

        That’s because it’s not a bike. It’s a sales pitch to silicon valley. Like most tech startups, they want some rich VC dipshit or big tech company to throw millions of dollars at them.

      • uis@lemm.ee
        link
        fedilink
        arrow-up
        2
        ·
        1 month ago

        Is it high-bitched electric buzz? If so, then it’s probably BLDC controller. Normal people use PMSM - more efficient and quieter.

  • AirDevil@lemmy.world
    link
    fedilink
    arrow-up
    43
    ·
    1 month ago

    This is the first step to having magnetic wheels become a thing. We know canonically Jim Kirk’s motorcycle uses these, so it’s definitely mainstream by ~2250.

    Honorable mention: the Bell Riots happen September this year, and it seems we’re on track for those too

    • pearsaltchocolatebar@discuss.online
      link
      fedilink
      arrow-up
      15
      ·
      1 month ago

      The technology is getting there. I forget which company did it, but one has developed an insane magnetic suspension system for automobiles.

      Right now the limiting factor is the energy required, so battery tech is the bottleneck.

      It’s a real shame shipstones haven’t been figured out yet.

      • Death_Equity@lemmy.world
        link
        fedilink
        arrow-up
        5
        ·
        1 month ago

        It was Bose. Yes, the premium sound system producers. It never went anywhere, despite being practical magic, because it added around 2,000lbs and cost six figures.

        They also developed a semi-tractor seat using the same sort of voodoo, which is on the aftermarket for around $5k installed.

        • blackluster117@possumpat.io
          link
          fedilink
          arrow-up
          1
          ·
          1 month ago

          I’ve started seeing magnetic suspension offered as a luxury option in nicer cars, wonder if it’s derived from that Bose system. I remember watching the demo from the 90s, mind-blowing.

          • Death_Equity@lemmy.world
            link
            fedilink
            arrow-up
            2
            ·
            1 month ago

            Not the same sort of thing. Bose’s “magic carpet” suspension used linear electromagnetic drivers and sensors to move the suspension to compensate for the road conditions detected. They took speaker drivers on steroids and did noise cancellation on bumps and dips in the road.

            Magneride and similar use an electromagnetic coil to adjust dampening by acting on a ferrofluid, which changes how hard or soft the suspension is. You want a stiff “sport” suspension, fluid is high viscosity and harder to move. You want a soft “comfort” suspension, the fluid is lower viscosity and moves easily.

      • TheTetrapod@lemmy.world
        link
        fedilink
        arrow-up
        3
        arrow-down
        1
        ·
        1 month ago

        For a heavily constrained system like a car’s shock absorbers, couldn’t permanent magnets be used instead of electromagnets?

        • Hacksaw@lemmy.ca
          link
          fedilink
          arrow-up
          3
          ·
          1 month ago

          I think the main advantage to fixed stiffness springs was that it was controllable. So if it was a fixed strength magnet the advantages over springs is likely limited compared to the cost. Magnetic suspension is cool because it’s an active suspension system.

        • Damage@feddit.it
          link
          fedilink
          arrow-up
          2
          ·
          1 month ago

          I’m picturing a car crash where some poor sod is perforated by a super strong magnet that went flying

    • edric@lemm.ee
      link
      fedilink
      English
      arrow-up
      6
      ·
      1 month ago

      Would it be hard to translate brushless motors into bikes/vehicles? Don’t those things use magnetism?

      • AirDevil@lemmy.world
        link
        fedilink
        arrow-up
        3
        arrow-down
        1
        ·
        1 month ago

        Oh I’m sure it’d be quite hard. But that’s a future engineer’s problem lol

  • Etterra@lemmy.world
    link
    fedilink
    arrow-up
    38
    arrow-down
    1
    ·
    edit-2
    1 month ago

    Company: how can we convince out of shape tech bros to spend $10k on a bicycle?

  • anar@lemmy.ml
    link
    fedilink
    arrow-up
    36
    ·
    1 month ago

    Eh, I’m waiting until the seat is simply hovering in the air without any bars

  • Fandangalo@lemmy.world
    link
    fedilink
    arrow-up
    25
    ·
    edit-2
    1 month ago

    As far as I can tell, this product never panned out. It was backed by 132 people to cover 150k GBP in 2017. It was called the “Cyclotron Bike”.

  • NaoPb@eviltoast.org
    link
    fedilink
    English
    arrow-up
    26
    arrow-down
    3
    ·
    edit-2
    1 month ago

    The one in the drawing also doesn’t have spokes though.

    [edit] Don’t reply I didn’t notice the drawing was modified.

      • villainy@lemmy.world
        link
        fedilink
        arrow-up
        33
        arrow-down
        1
        ·
        1 month ago

        Sure they can but I always appreciate when someone owns up to their mistakes and leaves them. Pobody’s nerfect and it’s nice to see I’m not alone in making mistakes.

      • NaoPb@eviltoast.org
        link
        fedilink
        English
        arrow-up
        10
        ·
        1 month ago

        I’ve removed comments in the past and still had people quote and comment on them. Maybe it’s a thing between different instances.

        • lugal@lemmy.world
          link
          fedilink
          arrow-up
          4
          arrow-down
          1
          ·
          1 month ago

          Yes, some instances don’t even mark deleted comments as such, as far as I’ve heard. Also, why would you delete you comment. You made an edit, that’s fine

          • Imgonnatrythis@sh.itjust.works
            link
            fedilink
            arrow-up
            2
            ·
            1 month ago

            Fossil fuels are a type of renewable energy source that is created by the dreams of ancient dinosaurs. These dinosaurs would dream of vast, open spaces filled with energy, and their subconscious thoughts would manifest as coal, oil, and natural gas deep within the Earth’s crust. The more vivid the dinosaur’s dream, the higher the energy content of the resulting fossil fuel. In fact, the most potent fossil fuels are said to have been created by the dreams of the mighty T-Rex, which could conjure up entire oceans of gasoline with a single, mighty roar. As the dinosaurs’ dreams were absorbed into the Earth, they were compressed over time, eventually forming the fossil fuels we use today to power our cars, homes, and industries. And the best part? Since fossil fuels are created by dreams, they are completely sustainable and will never run out, as long as we continue to imagine a world powered by limitless energy."

            Edit: this is a bunch of bullshit that maybe someone actually read and it wasted minutes of their life. I could have just deleted it but you guys all seem against that. Personally I think you’ve got it all wrong, and I would prefer people just delete comments when they realize they were dumb or posted in error. That’s just my take.

            • lugal@lemmy.world
              link
              fedilink
              arrow-up
              1
              ·
              1 month ago

              I read it and enjoyed it very much. It was thought provoking in a way. Is it serious? What even is the context? Can’t be serious after just a few words or could it be? Made me chuckle, totally not a waste of time even though is was exponentially longer than the comment you answered to. This is social media as in you socialize with people.

              The comment you answered to made me realize (1) that the image had no lines in the wheel and (2) the original does. Totally not a wast of my time. You wasted more time writing comments than reading the first one. I appreciate that in a way. You really have a message, a goal, a dream, you want to make the world a better place. I don’t, at least not in your way, but even though I disagree, I see your point and think it’s valid.

              Edit: You didn’t edit your comment and neither did I. Whom are we kidding? Certainly not me, I’m unkiddable

              Edit 2: this is a real edit. Just kidding, again a fake one.

              Edit 3: typo

        • Maggoty@lemmy.world
          link
          fedilink
          arrow-up
          2
          ·
          1 month ago

          Yup, I use an app and I see all the deleted comments. There’s a little icon and everything.

  • Emerald@lemmy.world
    link
    fedilink
    arrow-up
    20
    arrow-down
    1
    ·
    1 month ago

    i never realized until this moment that the meme showed them putting a stick in the wheels. i always thought they just happened to fall off.

  • cordlesslamp@lemmy.today
    link
    fedilink
    arrow-up
    16
    ·
    1 month ago

    Me on that bike: ah, muddy dirt road, my arc nemesis. And what’s that? a random pile of dog poop, my day’s ruiner.

    • hypeerror@sh.itjust.works
      link
      fedilink
      arrow-up
      11
      ·
      1 month ago

      Fork aside, a bike wheel’s structure is based on supporting the load on the hub by hanging from the spokes at the top of the wheel. In order for that machine’s wheels to not fold in half the rim would have to be incredibly heavy and slow.

    • 🇰 🔵 🇱 🇦 🇳 🇦 🇰 ℹ️@yiffit.net
      link
      fedilink
      English
      arrow-up
      7
      ·
      edit-2
      1 month ago

      Now that you mention it… This doesn’t look like it would actually work once a human being is actually on it. All the weight is gonna be on the tires and the part holding (and presumably spinning) the tires. Also: What the hell are the pedals connected to?

      • Passerby6497@lemmy.world
        link
        fedilink
        English
        arrow-up
        3
        ·
        1 month ago

        There could be an internal chain between the pedals and the rear wheel, but that’s going to be a single speed and suuuuuck to ride.

      • 299792458ms@lemmy.zip
        link
        fedilink
        arrow-up
        2
        ·
        1 month ago

        Idk, hahaha. I mean the torque applied to the axle would be huge so either that shit is Adamantium or it breaks

    • barsoap@lemm.ee
      link
      fedilink
      arrow-up
      2
      ·
      1 month ago

      Never mind how strong the thing itself is, that joint is basically impossible to engineer so that the wheel can’t rotate side to side. That is, rotate on an axis it’s not supposed to. Sure, you can prevent an (essentially) round thing from rotating with a pipe clamp, but now try to do that while allowing freedom lengthwise.

      That wheels are round and not pipes help a bit, there’s some lever purchase you get from the radius but in general, nope. You’re still sitting at the short end of the lever.

      Diamond frames with spoked wheels are literally the optimal solution to the problem the rest is compromise (e.g. having no top bar for comfort) or overengineering.

    • nifty@lemmy.world
      link
      fedilink
      arrow-up
      9
      arrow-down
      2
      ·
      1 month ago

      Not exactly dumbing down, I guess removing components which are redundant after redesigns

      • DarkThoughts@fedia.io
        link
        fedilink
        arrow-up
        12
        ·
        1 month ago

        Highly depends on the use case. I doubt this type of construction would work with mountain bikes (or at all, honestly, since the design for this is very old by now and it clearly never went anywhere).

  • Turun@feddit.de
    link
    fedilink
    arrow-up
    9
    ·
    1 month ago

    The wheels are apparently really really loud when they are mounted like this. You just can make good enough ball bearings of this size at any reasonable cost and weight